S.H.A.R.E research study
Stopping the Spread of HIV/AIDS through Relationship Engagement.
Nationwide
Compensation Provided
African American Women
Speak Fluent
English
Mothers & Daughters (12-21 years old)
Fast Facts
About this research study:
The overall objective of this study is to better understand the relationship and communication characteristics of African American HIV+ mothers and their adolescent daughters (ages 12-21) and to examine how these characteristics influence the HIV sexual risk behaviors of their adolescent daughters.
Women of color worldwide are affected by HIV/AIDS at rates far higher than any other race. In the last decade, the incidence of HIV/AIDS in these communities saw a slight decline. In 2016, African American women accounted for 4,560 (61%) of the estimated new HIV infections among all women (CDC, 2018). This is an alarming statistic as African American women over the ages of 18 make up only 13% of the female population, yet account for the majority of new HIV/AIDS cases. This statistic demonstrates the need to develop programs focusing on African women and their daughters.
Additional Information
Why is this study being done?
The S.H.A.R.E research study is designed to address some of the reasons why the prevalence of HIV/AIDS is experienced disproportionately among African American women. Women of color worldwide are affected by HIV/AIDS at rates far higher than any other race. In the last decade, the incidence of HIV/AIDS in these communities saw a slight decline. In 2016, African American women accounted for 4,560 (61%) of the estimated new HIV infections among all women (CDC, 2018). This is an alarming statistic as African American women over the ages of 18 make up only 13% of the female population, yet account for the majority of new HIV/AIDS cases. This statistic demonstrates the need to develop programs focusing on African women and their daughters.

Nationwide, African American youth represent one of the fastest-growing HIV risk groups with nearly 60% of all new HIV infections among adolescents aged 13-24 (CDC, 2018). Among adolescent females, the rate of new HIV infections is six times higher than that of young Hispanic females and twenty times higher than White females (CDC, 2014). Additionally, African American females report earlier sexual debut, less condom use, more adolescent pregnancy, and a higher rate of sexually transmitted infections when compared with other racial and ethnic groups.

African American daughters have been found to be more parent-oriented, perceive greater support from parents, and are more likely to prefer parents to peers as sources of sexual and contraceptive information than their counterparts of other races/ethnicities (Cedarbaum, 2012). Among sexually active adolescents, parent-child sexual risk communication has been associated with more responsible sexual attitudes and behaviors, including more frequent and consistent condom use, sexual risk communication, and self-efficacy (Henrich et al, 2003). Therefore, mothers who have tested positive for HIV are essential in this study to help promote HIV prevention activities, as the continued high HIV risk for African American female adolescents necessitates sustained efforts to develop innovative HIV risk reduction interventions for this population.

Is this study for me?
Eligibility Criteria for mothers:

  • Self-identify as an African American woman (ethnicity identified by self-report and inclusive of African and Caribbean women);
  • HIV positive with verification from clinical data;
  • Have a daughter age 12 - 21 years old;
  • Adolescent daughter resides with the mother at least 50% of the time;
  • Must speak English fluently.

Eligibility Criteria for daughters:
  • Self-identify as African American (ethnicity identified by self-report and inclusive of African and Caribbean women)
  • HIV negative
  • 12 - 21 years old
  • Must live with her mother at least 50% of the time;
  • Must speak English fluently.
What will happen if I participate in the study?
Your names will not be used in the final reports, only a summary of what themes come from the entire group. The risks involved with this study include some discomfort regarding the nature of the questions being discussed around HIV/AIDS. If you feel some discomfort we can refer to you to a counselor who can talk to you.
Will I be paid for being in this research study?
Compensation is provided.
Will it cost me anything to participate in this study?
All study is provided at no cost.