Stop the Pop
An intervention to reduce sugar-sweetened beverage consumption among children
Compensation Provided
Consume Sugary Drinks Daily
3-Day Research
8 - 14 Years Old
Fast Facts
Virtually or In-Person
About this research study:
The purpose of this study is to determine whether children who normally drink sugary drinks develop symptoms if they are unable to consume these drinks for a few days.
Sugary drinks are a key source of calories, added sugar, and caffeine in children's diets. Excess consumption of these beverages are also related to development of obesity, diabetes, and heart disease. Despite widespread guidance to reduce consumption, children often have difficulty avoiding sugary drinks, which may be due to developing physical and emotional responses.

However, a measurement tools that are able to identify sugar-sweetened beverage symptoms does not exist. By doing this study, we hope to create, test, and disseminate a tool to measure responses associated with sugar drink restriction in children.
Additional Information
Why is this study being done?
Sugary drinks are a key source of calories, added sugar, and caffeine in children's diets. Excess consumption of these drinks is also related to development of obesity, diabetes, and heart disease. Despite widespread guidance to reduce sugary beverage consumption, children often have difficulty avoiding these drinks, which may be due to developing symptoms. However, a measurement tools that are able to identify sugar-sweetened beverage responses does not exist.

We have created a tool to measure these responses from sugary drinks. We are now looking to see if this tool can successfully measure symptoms that children may experience from the removal of sugary drinks for 3 days. The tool was created by first collecting and grouping together the feelings that another set of children reported after removing sugary drinks from their diet. These feelings were then combined with other measures of responses that already exist.
The ability to measure these symptoms from sugary drinks will be beneficial for understanding the responses that children who consume sugary drinks may experience when they are asked to briefly stop sugary drink consumption.
How many people will take part in this research study?
We expect that 300 children will take part in the entire study.
What happens if I agree to be in this research?
If your child decides to participate in the research, a member of the study team will meet with you virtually or in-person for approximately 30 minutes. During this meeting, you and your child will complete a beverage consumption questionnaire about your child's usual beverage intake, and your child will complete a questionnaire about how they are feeling. After this your child will be instructed to avoid sugar drinks for 72 hours. You and your child will be counseled by the research team about specific beverages to avoid, based on your questionnaire responses.

During 72 hours of avoiding sugaring drinks, you and your child will be asked to complete the feelings questionnaire electronically each day to measure their responses. You and your child will also complete a daily electronic beverage log to keep track of what you have been drinking during these three days. Text messages and/or email reminders to avoid sugary beverages and to complete the feelings questionnaire and beverage log each day will be sent to you and your child twice daily throughout the 72 hours. A $50 Amazon gift card will be provided to you (electronically or in-person) as compensation after completion of the study.
Are there any costs for participating in this research?
There are no costs to you for taking part in this study.
Will I be paid for my participation in this research?
If your child agrees to take part and completes this research study, a $50 gift card will be provided (electronically or in-person) after completion of the study.
You are responsible for paying income taxes on any payments provided by the study. If you receive $600 or more from the University (or the GW Medical Faculty Associate), GW must report the amount you receive to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) on the form 1099-Misc. This form tells the IRS that payment was made to you, but it does not say that you were paid for taking part in this research study. You should talk to your tax advisor regarding the proper use of this form 1099-Misc.